Some i-phone TIPS!! we take questions too.

October 3, 2008

Tips from various sources, including Apple site, David Pogue, etc.  Let us know if you have problems with your iphone and ill see what i can dig up for your. personally, i find new things about the i-phone everyday. It is more than what I thought and then some.

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iPhone: The Missing Manual Sneak Preview: David Pogue’s Favorite iPhone Tricks
iPhone: The Missing Manual

The iPhone’s finger-driven interface seems natural and obvious. But when you really think about it, making it seem that way was no easy task. There are no menus in the iPhone software, for example, and no checkboxes or radio buttons. Everything on the screen has to be big enough for a fleshy fingertip.

On the other hand, the finger makes an outstanding pointing device; heck, you’ve been pointing with it all your life. It’s much faster to scroll diagonally with a fingertip, for example, than with fussy adjustments on two different scroll bars.

Here, then, are some of the iPhone’s unadvertised taps, double-taps, and other shortcuts, all culled from iPhone: The Missing Manual.
Double-Tapping

Double-tapping is actually pretty rare on the iPhone. It’s not like the Mac or Windows, where double-clicking the mouse means “open.” On the iPhone, you open something with one tap.

A double tap, therefore, is reserved for three functions:

* In Photos, Google Maps, and Safari (the Web browser), double-tapping zooms in on whatever you tap, magnifying it by a factor of two.
* In the same programs, as well as Mail, double-tapping means, “restore to original size” after you’ve zoomed in. (Weirdly, in Google Maps, you use a different gesture to zoom out: tap once with two fingers. That gesture appears nowhere else on the iPhone.)
*
David Pogue with his iPhone
When you’re watching a video, double-tapping eliminates or restores letterbox bars.
See, the iPhone’s screen is bright, vibrant, and stunningly sharp. It’s not, however, the right shape for videos.
Standard TV shows are squarish, not rectangular. So when you watch TV shows, you get black letterbox columns on either side of the picture.

Movies have the opposite problem. They’re too wide for the iPhone screen. So when you watch movies, you wind up with letterbox bars above and below the picture.

Some people are fine with that. At least when letterbox bars are onscreen, you know you’re seeing the complete composition of the scene the director intended.

Other people can’t stand letterbox bars. You’re already watching on a pretty small screen; why sacrifice some of that precious area to black bars?

That’s why the iPhone gives you a choice. If you double-tap the video as it plays, you zoom in, magnifying the image so that it fills the entire screen.

Part of the image is now off the screen; now you’re not seeing the entire composition originally broadcast. You lose the top and bottom of TV scenes, or the left and right edges of movie scenes.

If this effect winds up chopping off something important—some text on the screen, for example—restoring the original letterbox view is just another double-tap away.

Secrets of the Sensors

The iPhone has three cool sensors. First, it has an accelerometer that detects when you’ve rotated the iPhone into landscape orientation. In programs like Photos, Safari, and iPod, it triggers the screen image to rotate as well.

Camouflaged behind the black glass where you can’t see them except with a bright flashlight are two more sensors: a proximity sensor that shuts off the screen illumination and touch sensitivity when the phone is against your head (it works only in the Phone application), and an ambient-light sensor that brightens the display when you’re in sunlight and dims it in darker places.

Apple says that it experimented with having the light sensor active all the time, but it was weird to have the screen get brighter and darker all the time. So the sensor now samples the ambient light, and adjusts the brightness; it does this only once—each time you unlock the phone after waking it.

You can use that tip to your advantage. By covering up the sensor (just above the earpiece) as you unlock the phone, you force it to a low-power, dim screen-brightness setting (because the phone believes that it’s in a dark room). Or by holding it up to a light as you wake it, you get full brightness. In both cases, you’ve saved all the taps and navigation it would have taken you to find the manual brightness slider in Settings.

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